Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, St. John’s welcome you!  We hope you will visit us this Sunday or during the week.  After the Sunday service, look for our greeters at the exits of the church who can provide you with more information about St. John’s and answer any questions you may have.

Office hours:  8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday

You may email us at info@saint-john.org or contact the church office at (850) 222-2636 for more information.

Another option is to fill out a Newcomer Form and email it back to Lisa@saint-john.org . A member of the clergy will be in touch.



SUNDAY SERVICES 

8:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite I

9:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choirs & Children's Chapel

11:15 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choir

5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, Chapel

8:00 p.m. - Compline in the church 

WEEKDAY SERVICES

 7:15 a.m. - Morning Prayer (Wednesday)
 12:10 p.m. - Monday, Friday, Holy Eucharist, (Chapel); Wednesdays - Healing Service

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>  St. John’s is located at 211 N. Monroe Street in downtown Tallahassee.

We are on the corner of Call and Monroe Streets next to Capital City Bank. 

> Parking is available along Call and Calhoun Streets or behind our Bookstore on

   Calhoun Street.

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St. John’s is a welcoming community. Daily worship, a bustling cafe and bookstore and meeting spaces are open to the public. We are a downtown church that joyfully extends our hospitality to our members and the community. Be sure to see one of our greeters after the service who can provide you with information about St. John’s and answer your questions.

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What types of programs are available for children and youth?     We offer engaging 
spiritual enrichment opportunities for children and youth. Click here for more
information on children and youth.

What is the purpose of St. John’s?    We seek to love and serve Christ and our neighbors in Tallahassee and the world. More on our Core Values

What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?    We have a wonderful web resource that explains the Episcopal life and what it means to be an Episcopalian. If you need more information, contact us. We look forward to seeing you.

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Visiting St. John's?

Loving and serving Christ and Our Neighbors in Tallahassee and the World.

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Advent Devotion December 14

Gospel Reading for the Day:

Matthew 23:13-26 (NIV)

13 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You shut the door of the kingdom of heaven in people’s faces. You yourselves do not enter, nor will you let those enter who are trying to. [14] [a]

15 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You travel over land and sea to win a single convert, and when you have succeeded, you make them twice as much a child of hell as you are.

16 “Woe to you, blind guides! You say, ‘If anyone swears by the temple, it means nothing; but anyone who swears by the gold of the temple is bound by that oath.’ 17 You blind fools! Which is greater: the gold, or the temple that makes the gold sacred? 18 You also say, ‘If anyone swears by the altar, it means nothing; but anyone who swears by the gift on the altar is bound by that oath.’ 19 You blind men! Which is greater: the gift, or the altar that makes the gift sacred? 20 Therefore, anyone who swears by the altar swears by it and by everything on it. 21 And anyone who swears by the temple swears by it and by the one who dwells in it.22 And anyone who swears by heaven swears by God’s throne and by the one who sits on it.

23 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You give a tenth of your spices—mint, dill and cumin. But you have neglected the more important matters of the law—justice, mercy and faithfulness. You should have practiced the latter, without neglecting the former. 24 You blind guides! You strain out a gnat but swallow a camel.

25 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You clean the outside of the cup and dish, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence. 26 Blind Pharisee! First clean the inside of the cup and dish, and then the outside also will be clean.

Reflection

Precision, accuracy, exactness—these are terms used to express a job well done. Whether it be for a mundane action, such as a putt across the green into the cup, or an extraordinary feat like the launched lunar module following its predetermined orbit, to recognize another person’s precision is to pay a high compliment.  In practicing our faith, however, precision is not just insufficient, it’s the wrong target. 

The Pharisees in the reading have it all wrong.  As the old adage goes, they follow the letter of the law, but not its spirit.  Their shortcoming is repeated in modern times as well.

How many times have I been in church and stood up when it’s time to stand up, sung when it’s time to sing, and sat down and been quiet for the sermon, while my mind was elsewhere? Similarly, how many times have I sprinkled money on a charity or set aside a few convenient hours to volunteer, but where was my heart? 

Christ doesn’t call us to check boxes or to do just enough. His call is for us to be consumed by his love and to act because of his love.

Christ lived and died for us because he loves us. There is nothing we can do to make him love us. To attend church or otherwise “do what Christians do” out of mere obligation is to have it just as wrong as the Pharisees did.

We don’t deserve a thing, but here we are. And because we are in God’s grace, we should be joyful in service, in worship, in all that we do.

Written by David Childs

 

 

 

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