Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, St. John’s welcome you!  We hope you will visit us this Sunday or during the week.  After the Sunday service, look for our greeters at the exits of the church who can provide you with more information about St. John’s and answer any questions you may have.

Office hours:  8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday

You may email us at info@saint-john.org or contact the church office at (850) 222-2636 for more information.

Another option is to fill out a Newcomer Form and email it back to Lisa@saint-john.org . A member of the clergy will be in touch.



SUNDAY SERVICES 

8:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite I

9:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choirs & Children's Chapel

11:15 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choir

5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, Chapel

8:00 p.m. - Compline in the church 

WEEKDAY SERVICES

 7:15 a.m. - Morning Prayer (Wednesday)
 12:10 p.m. - Monday, Friday, Holy Eucharist, (Chapel); Wednesdays - Healing Service

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>  St. John’s is located at 211 N. Monroe Street in downtown Tallahassee.

We are on the corner of Call and Monroe Streets next to Capital City Bank. 

> Parking is available along Call and Calhoun Streets or behind our Bookstore on

   Calhoun Street.

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St. John’s is a welcoming community. Daily worship, a bustling cafe and bookstore and meeting spaces are open to the public. We are a downtown church that joyfully extends our hospitality to our members and the community. Be sure to see one of our greeters after the service who can provide you with information about St. John’s and answer your questions.

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What types of programs are available for children and youth?     We offer engaging 
spiritual enrichment opportunities for children and youth. Click here for more
information on children and youth.

What is the purpose of St. John’s?    We seek to love and serve Christ and our neighbors in Tallahassee and the world. More on our Core Values

What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?    We have a wonderful web resource that explains the Episcopal life and what it means to be an Episcopalian. If you need more information, contact us. We look forward to seeing you.

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Visiting St. John's?

Loving and serving Christ and Our Neighbors in Tallahassee and the World.

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Advent Devotion December 16

Gospel Reading for the Day:

Matthew 24:1-14 (NIV)

24 Jesus left the temple and was walking away when his disciples came up to him to call his attention to its buildings. “Do you see all these things?” he asked. “Truly I tell you, not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.”

As Jesus was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to him privately. “Tell us,” they said, “when will this happen, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?”

Jesus answered: “Watch out that no one deceives you. For many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am the Messiah,’ and will deceive many.You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come. Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are the beginning of birth pains.

“Then you will be handed over to be persecuted and put to death, and you will be hated by all nations because of me. 10 At that time many will turn away from the faith and will betray and hate each other, 11 and many false prophets will appear and deceive many people. 12 Because of the increase of wickedness, the love of most will grow cold, 13 but the one who stands firm to the end will be saved. 14 And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come.

Reflection

I’m going to come at this straight on: Jesus’ words about the end times sound a whole lot like the present day.

As I read Jesus’ warning to be wary of deceivers, the phrase “fake news” pops into my head before I can even finish the passage. It’s hard to accept anything we read or hear these days at face value, at least not without first questioning the messenger’s possible motives, not to mention the forces at work actively trying to deceive us, for purposes ranging from personal to global gain.

As I read on, more thoughts interrupt and intrude upon my focus.

“Nation will rise against nation.” Russia. North Korea. Iran.

“Famines and earthquakes.” Houston, Puerto Rico, Mexico City.

“Many will turn away from faith, and will betray and hate each other.” Partisan politics, racial tensions, social media!

Whew.  I wonder how many of our predecessors have read these words over the past two millennia and concluded that the end times were upon them? It’s certainly not hard for me to do that right now in 2017.

“Because of the increase in wickedness, the love of most will grow cold, but the one who stands firm to the end will be saved.” This time, Jesus’ words trigger something more positive in my mind. Specifically, Robert Schuller’s famous adage: “Tough times never last, but tough people do.”

Jesus is directly telling us to stay strong. Be tough when the going gets tough. Believe in me. Have faith, even in the worst of times, and you will be saved.

A final thought enters my mind. The phrase “the one who stands firm” reminds me of our family at St. John’s and of our core value to be “firm at the core.” We here at St. John’s stand firm in faith.

Written by Dennis Schnittker

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