Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, St. John’s welcome you!  We hope you will visit us this Sunday or during the week.  After the Sunday service, look for our greeters at the exits of the church who can provide you with more information about St. John’s and answer any questions you may have.

Office hours:  8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday

You may email us at info@saint-john.org or contact the church office at (850) 222-2636 for more information.

Another option is to fill out a Newcomer Form and email it back to Lisa@saint-john.org . A member of the clergy will be in touch.



SUNDAY SERVICES 

8:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite I

9:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choirs & Children's Chapel

11:15 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choir

5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, Chapel

8:00 p.m. - Compline in the church 

WEEKDAY SERVICES

 7:15 a.m. - Morning Prayer (Wednesday)
 12:10 p.m. - Monday, Friday, Holy Eucharist, (Chapel); Wednesdays - Healing Service

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>  St. John’s is located at 211 N. Monroe Street in downtown Tallahassee.

We are on the corner of Call and Monroe Streets next to Capital City Bank. 

> Parking is available along Call and Calhoun Streets or behind our Bookstore on

   Calhoun Street.

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St. John’s is a welcoming community. Daily worship, a bustling cafe and bookstore and meeting spaces are open to the public. We are a downtown church that joyfully extends our hospitality to our members and the community. Be sure to see one of our greeters after the service who can provide you with information about St. John’s and answer your questions.

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What types of programs are available for children and youth?     We offer engaging 
spiritual enrichment opportunities for children and youth. Click here for more
information on children and youth.

What is the purpose of St. John’s?    We seek to love and serve Christ and our neighbors in Tallahassee and the world. More on our Core Values

What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?    We have a wonderful web resource that explains the Episcopal life and what it means to be an Episcopalian. If you need more information, contact us. We look forward to seeing you.

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Visiting St. John's?

Loving and serving Christ and Our Neighbors in Tallahassee and the World.

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Advent Devotion December 6

Gospel Reading for the Day:

Matthew 21:23-32 (NIV)

The Authority of Jesus Questioned

23 Jesus entered the temple courts, and, while he was teaching, the chief priests and the elders of the people came to him. “By what authority are you doing these things?” they asked. “And who gave you this authority?”

24 Jesus replied, “I will also ask you one question. If you answer me, I will tell you by what authority I am doing these things. 25 John’s baptism—where did it come from? Was it from heaven, or of human origin?”

They discussed it among themselves and said, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will ask, ‘Then why didn’t you believe him?’ 26 But if we say, ‘Of human origin’—we are afraid of the people, for they all hold that John was a prophet.”

27 So they answered Jesus, “We don’t know.”

Then he said, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.

28 “What do you think? There was a man who had two sons. He went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work today in the vineyard.’

29 “‘I will not,’ he answered, but later he changed his mind and went.

30 “Then the father went to the other son and said the same thing. He answered, ‘I will, sir,’ but he did not go.

31 “Which of the two did what his father wanted?”

“The first,” they answered.

Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you. 32 For John came to you to show you the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes did. And even after you saw this, you did not repent and believe him.

Reflection

When the chief priests question the authority of Jesus, I am reminded of how Jesus reacted in the face of opposition. The eternal teacher, Jesus, answers a question with a question. And the beauty of our faith and the Episcopal tradition is that we readily acknowledge none of us have all the answers. We accept that challenge before us to better understand God's word and our own roles in the world. 

The Parable of the Two Sons reminds us of today's common saying that “actions speak louder than words,” and that we are called to learn from the best of both sons. First, we must make the commitment to working in God's vineyard, and second, we must do the work. I believe that, like the father in the story, God wants his people to be doing the work in the world. Confirmation, or adult baptism, is one of the Christian ways of telling God we're ready to go work in the vineyard. But this parable serves as an opportunity to remember that it is more important to go do the work than it is to say you're going to do it.  

Written by Sean Cooley

 

 

 

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