Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, St. John’s welcome you!  We hope you will visit us this Sunday or during the week.  After the Sunday service, look for our greeters at the exits of the church who can provide you with more information about St. John’s and answer any questions you may have.

Office hours:  8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday

You may email us at info@saint-john.org or contact the church office at (850) 222-2636 for more information.

Another option is to fill out a Newcomer Form and email it back to Lisa@saint-john.org . A member of the clergy will be in touch.



SUNDAY SERVICES 

8:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite I

9:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choirs & Children's Chapel

11:15 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choir

5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, Chapel

8:00 p.m. - Compline in the church 

WEEKDAY SERVICES

 7:15 a.m. - Morning Prayer (Wednesday)
 12:10 p.m. - Monday, Friday, Holy Eucharist, (Chapel); Wednesdays - Healing Service

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>  St. John’s is located at 211 N. Monroe Street in downtown Tallahassee.

We are on the corner of Call and Monroe Streets next to Capital City Bank. 

> Parking is available along Call and Calhoun Streets or behind our Bookstore on

   Calhoun Street.

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St. John’s is a welcoming community. Daily worship, a bustling cafe and bookstore and meeting spaces are open to the public. We are a downtown church that joyfully extends our hospitality to our members and the community. Be sure to see one of our greeters after the service who can provide you with information about St. John’s and answer your questions.

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What types of programs are available for children and youth?     We offer engaging 
spiritual enrichment opportunities for children and youth. Click here for more
information on children and youth.

What is the purpose of St. John’s?    We seek to love and serve Christ and our neighbors in Tallahassee and the world. More on our Core Values

What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?    We have a wonderful web resource that explains the Episcopal life and what it means to be an Episcopalian. If you need more information, contact us. We look forward to seeing you.

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Visiting St. John's?

Loving and serving Christ and Our Neighbors in Tallahassee and the World.

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Advent Devotion December 7

Gospel Reading for the Day:

Matthew 21:33-46 (NIV)

The Parable of the Tenants

33 “Listen to another parable: There was a landowner who planted a vineyard. He put a wall around it, dug a winepress in it and built a watchtower. Then he rented the vineyard to some farmers and moved to another place. 34 When the harvest time approached, he sent his servants to the tenants to collect his fruit.

35 “The tenants seized his servants; they beat one, killed another, and stoned a third. 36 Then he sent other servants to them, more than the first time, and the tenants treated them the same way. 37 Last of all, he sent his son to them. ‘They will respect my son,’ he said.

38 “But when the tenants saw the son, they said to each other, ‘This is the heir. Come, let’s kill him and take his inheritance.’ 39 So they took him and threw him out of the vineyard and killed him.

40 “Therefore, when the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?”

41 “He will bring those wretches to a wretched end,” they replied, “and he will rent the vineyard to other tenants, who will give him his share of the crop at harvest time.”

42 Jesus said to them, “Have you never read in the Scriptures:

“‘The stone the builders rejected
    has become the cornerstone;
the Lord has done this,
    and it is marvelous in our eyes’[a]?

43 “Therefore I tell you that the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people who will produce its fruit. 44 Anyone who falls on this stone will be broken to pieces; anyone on whom it falls will be crushed.”[b]

45 When the chief priests and the Pharisees heard Jesus’ parables, they knew he was talking about them. 46 They looked for a way to arrest him, but they were afraid of the crowd because the people held that he was a prophet.

Reflection

When I think of the season of Advent, I think of “giving” and then I think back to my childhood and remember the amazing generosity of the people in the small town where we lived. It seemed that every day in the weeks leading up to Christmas, there would be another delicious dessert sitting on the kitchen counter that someone had made as a gift for my family. My family gave out Danish pastries, and all family members (including myself and my two younger brothers) were expected to participate in delivering the pastries to people all over town.

As a kid, there were many times when delivering pastries was the last thing I wanted to do. However, this feeling would usually only last until the first delivery. People were so happy see us, and they always enjoyed receiving the pastries. Many times the people receiving the pastries would invite us into their homes to visit with them for a while. As I look back, I can now see how a simple act of generosity made such a positive impact on me and many other people. 

In the scripture, Jesus says the Kingdom of God will be “given to a people who will produce its fruit.” We are called to produce fruit for the Kingdom of God. How will you produce fruit during this Advent season? By spending time with a friend you haven’t seen in a while? By helping those who are less fortunate? By donating generously to charity?

Written by Brooks Butler

 

 

 

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