Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, St. John’s welcome you!  We hope you will visit us this Sunday or during the week.  After the Sunday service, look for our greeters at the exits of the church who can provide you with more information about St. John’s and answer any questions you may have.

Office hours:  8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday

You may email us at info@saint-john.org or contact the church office at (850) 222-2636 for more information.

Another option is to fill out a Newcomer Form and email it back to Lisa@saint-john.org . A member of the clergy will be in touch.



SUNDAY SERVICES 

8:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite I

9:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choirs & Children's Chapel

11:15 a.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, choir

5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist, Rite II, Chapel

8:00 p.m. - Compline in the church 

WEEKDAY SERVICES

 7:15 a.m. - Morning Prayer (Wednesday)
 12:10 p.m. - Monday, Friday, Holy Eucharist, (Chapel); Wednesdays - Healing Service

worship-times-photo-visitor-pg-1.jpg

>  St. John’s is located at 211 N. Monroe Street in downtown Tallahassee.

We are on the corner of Call and Monroe Streets next to Capital City Bank. 

> Parking is available along Call and Calhoun Streets or behind our Bookstore on

   Calhoun Street.

map-1.png

St. John’s is a welcoming community. Daily worship, a bustling cafe and bookstore and meeting spaces are open to the public. We are a downtown church that joyfully extends our hospitality to our members and the community. Be sure to see one of our greeters after the service who can provide you with information about St. John’s and answer your questions.

what-to-expect-photo-visitors.jpg

What types of programs are available for children and youth?     We offer engaging 
spiritual enrichment opportunities for children and youth. Click here for more
information on children and youth.

What is the purpose of St. John’s?    We seek to love and serve Christ and our neighbors in Tallahassee and the world. More on our Core Values

What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?    We have a wonderful web resource that explains the Episcopal life and what it means to be an Episcopalian. If you need more information, contact us. We look forward to seeing you.

faqs-photo.jpg

Visiting St. John's?

Loving and serving Christ and Our Neighbors in Tallahassee and the World.

devotional-header.jpg

Advent Devotion December 5

Gospel Reading for the Day:

Matthew 21:12-22 (NIV)

12 Jesus entered the temple courts and drove out all who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves. 13 “It is written,” he said to them, “‘My house will be called a house of prayer,’[a] but you are making it ‘a den of robbers.’[b]

14 The blind and the lame came to him at the temple, and he healed them. 15 But when the chief priests and the teachers of the law saw the wonderful things he did and the children shouting in the temple courts, “Hosanna to the Son of David,” they were indignant.

16 “Do you hear what these children are saying?” they asked him.

“Yes,” replied Jesus, “have you never read,

“‘From the lips of children and infants
    you, Lord, have called forth your praise’[c]?”

17 And he left them and went out of the city to Bethany, where he spent the night.

18 Early in the morning, as Jesus was on his way back to the city, he was hungry. 19 Seeing a fig tree by the road, he went up to it but found nothing on it except leaves. Then he said to it, “May you never bear fruit again!” Immediately the tree withered.

20 When the disciples saw this, they were amazed. “How did the fig tree wither so quickly?” they asked.

21 Jesus replied, “Truly I tell you, if you have faith and do not doubt, not only can you do what was done to the fig tree, but also you can say to this mountain, ‘Go, throw yourself into the sea,’ and it will be done. 22 If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer.”

Reflection

As a mom, when Scripture explicitly says, “My house will be called a house of prayer,” my response is: “O.K., God, I hear you! Your instructions are clear!” While my home is no den of robbers, between the dishes and the laundry and the hustle of life, I wouldn’t say it’s hard to fit in prayer. It’s just, unfortunately, sometimes easy to forget. But God explicitly commands us to call our home a house of prayer; he is clearly telling us to guide and direct our family to prayer.

 Prayer is as simple as the routine of grace before a meal. We say the same grace of my childhood: “God is great, God is good...” When I hear my daughter (and, I expect, my young sons once they can speak) say those words, there is an immediate comfort in the nostalgia, the routine, and the peace of that prayer. What a quiet, beautiful moment for our family to share nightly before we eat a meal together. This act of praying together is praise to God. Verse sixteen especially hits home for me, the idea that prayer should come “from the lips of children and infants.” How powerful it is to know that God hears and desires even the most basic of prayers and praise from my children’s mouths. As we encourage prayer in our home, we grow in our connection to God.

In the latter half of this reading, Jesus reminds us that if we have faith without doubt, we can move mountains. I won’t lie; it’s a tempting superpower for this working mom who is focused on checking everything off the to-do list, from household chores to client needs to those operose children’s prayers. But Matthew gives us the secret to the equation, bringing us full circle to the beginning of the passage—constant prayer unlocks the rock-solid faith. And that is a superpower that this supermom will continuously work toward!  

Written by Alli Liby-Schoonover

 

 

 

login